15. Second Bank of the U.S.

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Length: {1:20 minutes}

In Chapter 15 of Bill Still’s documentary, the focus is on the establishment of the Second Bank of the United States in 1816, just a year after the Battle of Waterloo and the alleged Rothschild takeover of the Bank of England.

The Second Bank of the United States was modeled after its predecessor, with the U.S. government owning 20% of its shares, paid for by the Treasury. This initial capital allowed the bank to leverage fractional reserve lending to provide loans to private investors, who purchased the remaining 80% of the shares.

The primary shareholders of the bank remained anonymous, but it was known that about one-third of the shares were sold to foreigners. This led to observations that the bank had strong ties to Britain, potentially as deep as its American connections. By 1816, it is suggested that the Rothschilds had significant influence over both the Bank of England and the newly established Second Bank of the United States.

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14. Waterloo

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Length: {6:05 minutes}

Bill Still’s documentary highlights the Rothschild family’s strategic and financial acumen during and after the Battle of Waterloo.

Following Napoleon’s escape from exile and subsequent defeat at Waterloo in 1815, Nathan Rothschild capitalized on his advance knowledge of the battle’s outcome. Rothschild had a network that provided him with the news before the British government, allowing him to manipulate the British stock market. By initially selling off his holdings and causing a market panic, he then bought up devalued bonds at a fraction of their worth, significantly increasing his wealth and influence.

This episode exemplifies how the Rothschilds used their intelligence network and financial strategies to gain control over the British bond market and potentially the Bank of England.

By the mid-1800s, the Rothschild family had become the wealthiest family in the world, dominating government bond markets and various industrial sectors. Despite their immense wealth, the family maintained a low profile, with most of their enterprises not bearing the Rothschild name.

The documentary suggests that their financial power has likely continued to grow, even as they have cultivated an image of reduced influence.

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9. The Bank of North America

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Length: {2:35 minutes}

Summary of Chapter 9: The Bank of North America

Towards the end of the American Revolution, the Continental Congress, desperate for funds, authorized Robert Morris, their financial superintendent, to establish a privately owned central bank in 1781. Morris, a wealthy man who had profited from trading war materials during the Revolution, founded the Bank of North America. This bank was modeled after the Bank of England, allowing it to practice fractional reserve banking, which meant it could lend money it did not have and charge interest on it.

The bank’s initial capital was supposed to come from private investors, but when Morris couldn’t raise the money, he used gold loaned by France to America. He then lent this money to himself and his associates to buy shares in the bank. The bank was granted a monopoly over the national currency, but the value of American currency continued to fall. As a result, in 1785, the bank’s charter was not renewed.

William Findley of Pennsylvania, a key opponent of the bank, criticized it for being driven by greed and seeking to control all wealth, power, and influence in the state. Despite this setback, the proponents of the bank, including Alexander Hamilton, Robert Morris, and the bank’s president Thomas Willing, did not give up. In 1791, Hamilton, then Secretary of the Treasury, and Morris successfully established a new privately owned central bank, the First Bank of the United States, with Willing again serving as its president. The key figures remained the same; only the name of the bank had changed.

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3. The Roman Empire

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Length: {1:35 minutes}

The chapter on the Roman Empire focuses on the historical context and role of money changers during ancient times. It explains that to understand the problem of money changers, one must look back to Europe and Biblical times. Jesus drove the money changers out of the temple, marking the only instance he used force in his ministry. This action was due to the money changers exploiting their position within the temple.

When Jews traveled to Jerusalem to pay their temple tax, they could only use a specific coin, the half shekel of the sanctuary, made of pure silver and without the image of a pagan emperor. This coin was the only one acceptable to God, according to Jewish belief. However, these coins were scarce because the money changers had cornered the market on them, inflating their price to whatever the market could bear. This monopoly allowed money changers to make exorbitant profits, forcing Jews to pay high prices. Jesus saw this as a violation of the sanctity of God’s house.

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